no beans about it

this lovely thursday brings yet another post from the mind of my husband, daniel morey. please enjoy his rantings.

 

As you’ve read in Molly’s previous posts, both she and I have reduced out alchohol consumption in an effort to live healthier lives. This became especially difficult for me as I had been a beer, wine and whiskey enthusiast for some time, even brewing my own beer several times a year. So to help offset the transition, I wasted no time diving head first into the realm of coffee. I’ve been in love with good coffee since I was a kid, but not until VERY recently, had I made it a hobby. So much in fact that I was very fortunate to receive a Chemex for my birthday (from my beautiful and thoughtful wife). So without wasting any more time, here’s a post on making pour over coffee with a Chemex……

brew

Gather your materials. If you’re stepping up to a Chemex, I’m going to assume that you don’t need me to list of what you’re going to need to make and just say that you’ll need the Chemex and a filter. The coffee I’m using is from a local roaster who just opened their door last  September by the name of Gaslight Roasters. You can take your fixie over to their shop HERE.

STEP 1 – Start boiling your water and use a thermometer. You don’t want to add boiling water to the grounds, so take the pot off the heat when the water reaches 200deg. In the mean, use your food scale to weigh out 30grams of coffee beans. You can play with this amount later on, but as a starting point, this will make one cup. Ground the  beans into a consistency between table and Kosher salt.

materials

weigh

grind

STEP 2- put a fresh filter into the Chemex. The filters are basically a folded piece of square paper, so face the 3-ply side towards the spout of the Chemex. Once your water is at 200 deg, pour a generous amount through the filter WITHOUT COFFEE in it, to clean the paper. Then empty the water out.

filter

wet

Step 3 – Pour your fresh ground coffee into the newly wet filter and slowly add 60 grams of water to simply wet the grounds. This is called the “bloom” and should occur for about 45 seconds. Your coffee’s aroma will really come alive, so don’t be shy about sticking your face into it for a healthy whiff.

dump

bloom

Step 4 – Pour the remaining 340 grams of water over the coffee. Pour slowly, keeping away from the edged of the filter but saturating the grounds thoroughly. This is the brewing process and should last for about 3 minutes. Once the water has gone through the filter, remove the filter from the Chemex and throw away.

fill

toss

FINALLY – your coffee is ready to drink. Grab your favorite mug and pour the coffee in, or if you’re a poor hipster, feel free to drink right from the Chemex.

emjoy

 

 

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5 thoughts on “no beans about it

  1. Ohhhh. Didn’t know you were supposed to rinse the filter first! Here’s a laugh for you – imagine having to do this process in a restaurant. We had the Chemex at Island Creek, and as fellow former servers, I’m sure you both can imagine the immense pit we’d get in our stomachs when guests would order this, especially when you’re in the weeds during a Saturday dinner rush. It is damn good coffee though!

  2. Sounds like Island Creek should have left the coffee to a coffee house or invested in the single cup Hario cones (http://tinyurl.com/bts89c6) to make things easier on everyone. This is the same reason boxed wine and packaged Frappaccinos exist. The majority of American’s like the idea of fine brewed coffee but in reality, they mostly just want a hot cup of sludge from the McDonald’s drive-thru. Unfortunately the two collide too often but at least occasionally we can slap a fancy name on convenience to satisfy. I suspect the pour over method isn’t necessarily for lovers of great coffee, but for those who love the work of creating great coffee. I enjoy the process, with all the precision and art include – aka: it’s fun, so I’m not going to order one where I don’t get enjoyment beyond the taste. Otherwise just order Dunkin’s large carmel with a turboshot.

  3. Sounds like Island Creek should have left the coffee to a coffee house or invested in the single cup Hario cones (http://tinyurl.com/bts89c6) to make things easier on everyone. This is the same reason boxed wine and packaged Frappaccinos exist. The majority of American’s like the idea of fine brewed coffee but in reality, they mostly just want a hot cup of sludge from the McDonald’s drive-thru. Unfortunately the two collide too often but at least occasionally we can slap a fancy name on convenience to satisfy. I suspect the pour over method isn’t necessarily for lovers of great coffee, but for those who love the work of creating great coffee. I enjoy the process, with all the precision and art include – aka: it’s fun, so I’m not going to order one where I don’t get enjoyment beyond the taste. Otherwise just order Dunkin’s large carmel with a turboshot.

  4. Pingback: sights unseen, dan’s birthday! | Workouts to Wine

  5. Pingback: top 11 things i ask dan for | Workouts to Wine

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